Archive for tiny sticks

Saturday Single: Clap Rules – “Old Sequencer”

Posted in Audio, Saturday Single, Video with tags , , , , , , , , , , on Saturday, June 20, 2009 by Erik Burg

In this week’s installment of the ever popular Saturday Single column, I’ll be reporting on the sterling new debut release on Tiny Sticks by three part electro duo Clap Rules. You might recognize the Tiny Sticks name if you read my interview with Cage & Aviary earlier this week, as they are set to release a 12″ later this year on the label as well. But newcomers Clap Rules are in the mix this week thanks to the awesome Old Sequencer single.

Clap RulesOld Sequencer Tiny Sticks Records iTunes/Vinyl

ClapRules-OldSequencer3

Clap Rules feels a lot like other material on Tiny Sticks, too (the face on the cover makes me feel right at home as well). Which is beyond stellar, seeing as some of my favorite electronic acts hail from the label (Mock & Toof especially). The titled A Side is a tight mix of disco influenced bass with a high pitched synth loop, changing ever-so-slightly throughout “Old Sequencer”. There’s live guitar to boot, making the track nearly perfect as a blend of live instrumentation and modern day house fanaticism. It’s funky, it’s groovy, it’s the future. As Juan Maclean said earlier this year: The Future Has Come. “Old Sequencer” is perfectly produced, as each looping section never gets old, and although the pace for the song never really leaves a certain BPM, the song still feels like it builds to a beautiful crescendo. The B Sides, “Never Half Step” and “Braxx” both sound amazing. Again drawing on deep house roots, the two songs make for great additions to the single. “Braxx” is probably the better of the two. The track adds some almost Simian Mobile Disco-like synth pulses to the bass line, making the track feel slightly more upbeat than “Old Sequencer”. It’s hard for me to not over-praise an album, and especially if it’s music like this. Deep house, post disco, electro fucking rock and roll (can you tell by the cursing that I’m excited?). Clap Rules is worth way more than a download, and worth way more than my amateur rambling, so I’ll stop. For a debut it’s incredible, and I can’t wait to hear more.

MP3: Clap Rules – “Old Sequencer”

Clap Rules performing “Never Half Step” live

Mind Inversion Exclusive Interview: Cage & Aviary

Posted in Audio, Interviews, Mind Inversion Exclusive with tags , , , , , , , , , , on Tuesday, June 16, 2009 by Erik Burg

cage and aviary interview picture

Part man, part machine, part cockatiel, Cage & Aviary take flights of fancy whenever they can.

Cage & Aviary, one part Jamie Paton and one part Nigel of Bermondsey, are busy people. They run a record label, they DJ, they produce, they jam. Their most recent release, the stellar Television Train/Suburban 12″ out now on DFA records (the euro version), has catapulted their success to a global scale. The two came stateside to play some of their first ever American DJ gigs in Los Angeles. So as their legend grows, and as their music continues to amaze, be sure to check them out. The two were nice enough to sit down and fill out a nice e-mail correspondence for Mind Inversion as well. Enjoy! (Nigel isn’t much for the talk)

Mind Inversion: So I’m barely 19 and have a limited knowledge, yet great appreciation and love of disco and house records from days gone by. I feel like all of your tracks draw upon very historic music, and music that most mainstream listeners don’t have an ear for. Elaborate on this idea, What from the past has influenced your music?
Jamie: I guess the short answer is lots of things, but that’s not much in the way of elaboration! We both bring lots of different influences to the mix, but our tastes also blend in some areas too – we both love the whole post-punk NY art-pop stuff like Talking Heads, and the Mancunian 80s new wave punk-funkers like A Certain Ratio and early New Order. We also have much love for the whole island records thing. A lot of this stuff when listened to now doesn’t sound mainstream but at the time, when the charts were made up of less formulaic production-line music, these oddball records made it into the upper reaches of the charts, I think it was an amazing time for popular music. Aside from all of that, I guess I bring more of a disco and house thing to the mix.
Nigel: I agree

MI: What is your model for creating music? I know you guys are involved in various other projects, so is the way you guys create started separately and then fused together at a different time, or is it more of the just sit down together with a plan and create tracks?
Jamie: We just sit down and jam really, see what comes out and take it from there. Recently we’ve been getting our live DJ set thing together, and the practice sessions for that have really produced some great new material, or at least starting points for them.
Nigel: I concur

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