Archive for Jellyfish Brigade

A Crow’s Mile – “Me Too”

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on Tuesday, September 30, 2014 by Terry Scott Niebeling

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Listen.

Album Review: Jellyfish Brigade, Diving Lessons

Posted in Album Review, Music Reviews with tags , , , , on Saturday, June 28, 2014 by Tim Althaus

a2597729900_10Aldous Huxley once said, “Experience is not what happens to you; it’s what you do with what happens to you.” I know this statement very well – mainly because it was my senior quote back in 2005. After listening to Jellyfish Brigade‘s new album Diving Lessons in great detail, it’s apparent that Lucas Dix also knows this statement; in fact, based on his lyrical content, it seems as though he’s beginning to master the philosophy. Lucas has been through more in the last two years than most people have in two decades; he lost his best friend and long-time music partner Gavin “Theory” Soens to a battle with terminal cancer, and the love of his life relocated to the opposite side of the country to be closer to her family. Saturated with real-life stories and relatable metaphors, Diving Lessons is one of the most profound and honest records of 2014.

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Coming Soon: “Diving Lessons”, Jellyfish Brigade

Posted in Album Premiere, Art, Media, Video with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on Monday, June 9, 2014 by Terry Scott Niebeling

Jellyfish Brigade’s Diving Lessons is set to be released June 24th, 2014.  Here is a little teaser for the album.  More to come soon.  The video and the site (below) explain it all.  Get ready.

More info on Jellyfish Brigade at http://jellyfishbrigade.com/.

Enjoy.

Timoteo’s 2012 Year In Review

Posted in Year in Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on Tuesday, December 25, 2012 by Tim Althaus

Me and Hansen

Is it really that time of year again? I have no idea where 2012 went; it seems like it was just January a few short months ago. In this seemingly short year, there has been a slew of superb releases – especially in the Hip-Hop realm. Like I’ve always said, making a year-end list is no simple task, and it’s inevitable that someone (or a lot of people) will disagree with my choices; however, opinions are unique to each individual, and we are all entitled to our own. If you feel the need to voice your opinion, leave a comment in the C-Section.

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Jellyfish Brigade: The Art of Being Pulled Apart 

Posted in Album Update, Media with tags , , , , on Thursday, December 6, 2012 by Tim Althaus

The Art of Being Pulled Apart

Let me tell you, it’s been one hell of a hectic day filled with slightly overwhelming obstacles, but I’ve come out victorious, and now I get to listen to Jellyfish Brigade’s new EP – The Art of Being Pulled Apart. I posted the lead single – “The Character is Me” – last week, and now we’re getting the full three track EP.

Here’s what the guys had to say about The Art of Being Pulled Apart:

“The Art of Being Pulled Apart is a short story about the heart, mind, body and soul drifting in separate directions and how we must inevitably pull our different selves back together. By intertwining tales from the river, love notes from distant cities, and fears of the unknown, we created a project that explores the breakdown process and the beauty in getting a chance to reassemble one’s self after a life changing experience. This collection of songs is influenced as much by campfire folk tunes and early 90’s R&B as it is story telling hip hop and melodic electronic beats. Its setting is somewhere in the Columbia River Gorge on a highway during a Sunday evening sunset. It touches on recognizing each person’s individuality while also realizing our tiny place in the collective. It jovially compares our fate to that of the salmon, who spend the autumn traveling back home to their demise. I guess, in short, we make honest, heartfelt songs about love, life and nature, all of which we enjoy deeply.”

I am completely blown away by all three of the tracks on this project, and it’s making me crave a full-length effort from these guys. As I mentioned in my post about “The Character is Me”, Lucas Dix is showing a great deal of vocal dexterity on Jellyfish Brigade’s new material, and it’s fascinating to watch him grow as he realizes his full potential as an artist. With every release the water becomes a little bit clearer for Jellyfish Brigade; however, something else becomes evident: The smack is growing, and it’s only gaining more momentum.

You can jump over to Jellyfish Brigade’s website and download the EP for free.99 here.

Jellyfish Brigade, “The Character is Me”

Posted in Audio, Media with tags , , , , , on Thursday, November 29, 2012 by Tim Althaus

jellyfish brigade photo by Amanda Barber

I woke up knowing that today was going to be a special day for one reason in particular: it’s Jellyfish season. You definitely heard me right, the smack is back, and they’ve got a lead single from their forthcoming project The Art of Being Pulled Apart – which drops on December 6th.

I’ve been craving new material from Mr. Dix & Mr. Acciaioli since they dropped Gills and a Helmet and Sunflowers last year, and “The Character is Me” is exactly what I’ve been waiting for.

Propelled by The Great Mundane’s mesmerizing melodies, Dix spits an eye opening retrospective and philosophical narrative about his life experiences in the Midwest and how they’ve shaped him into the man that he is today living in Portland:

” I think that I’ve learned the simplest things last/every situation ain’t a riddle or ink splat/As a teacher I can spot the shittiest mishaps/and know just what to say to make a miserable kid laugh/a warrior/a worrier/performing like a mourning bird chirping to the chords of a Wurlitzer”

If you know Lucas Dix, then you know he loves Andre 3000 because he’s such a versatile emcee. When I listen to “The Character is Me”, the influence of Three Stacks is ubiquitous; not only does Dix deliver vivid verses, but he boldly steps out of his comfort zone and defiantly delivers the track’s hook. In doing so, he expands his vocal dexterity as an artist – something that even Andre 3000 could definitely respect.