Archive for Pharoahe Monch

Reaction Editoral: The Source Ranks The 50 Greatest Lyricists of All-Time

Posted in News, Opinion Editorial with tags , , , , , , , , on Monday, August 6, 2012 by Tim Althaus

There is one thing that I have to ask before I descend any further into this post: is the opinion of The Source and its writers even relevant anymore? I personally feel like it has become one of the most watered down and bland Hip-Hop magazines on news stands; most of the articles, if not all, are full of information that is readily regurgitated without any effort whatsoever. Here’s the sad part: I remember when I was younger and The Source was my primary means of getting information on the Hip-Hop game. Sadly, times have drastically changed; magazines like Wax Poetics and Respect fuel my fire when I need some gasoline, and if I’m really hard up, I’ll go to XXL.

I was at Barnes & Noble the other day, and something on the cover on the July issue of The Source caught my eye: “Top 50 Lyricists”. I had to humor myself and take a look at what the brilliant reporters over at The Source had to say about this issue. With a tagline like “Now in an age when lyricism is taking a backseat to celebrity, The Source brings you the top 50 lyricists of all-time in an effort to put some focus back on the platform”, you would think that they actually had a great list – not quite.

I will admit that there were a lot of names that I didn’t even expect to see on the list – Pharoahe Monch, Black Thought, Guru & Big L to name a few. At the same time, there were emcees that I did not agree with at all, and the ones that I thought should have been included were very low on the list. In my opinion, some of the greatest emcees in the history of the game didn’t even get a nod at all.

Just a few of my main gripes with this fine piece of literature:

– How do you even include Rick Ross or Lil’ Wayne on this list? Aren’t they the epitome of lyricism taking a backseat to “celebrity”? I think so, and I can assure you that lyricist isn’t the first adjective I would use to describe The Teflon Don or Mr. Carter.

– Black Thought was ranked #34. What? You’re kidding right? Mr. Trotter deserves a top ten nod, especially amongst artists like Lil’ Wayne and Kanye West – who were all featured higher.

– Royce Da 5’9″ ranks in at #48 – just five spots below DMX. I don’t really think that I need to comment on this one too much further; most people reading this article probably agree that Nickel should much closer to top twenty.

– It’s great to have Lil’ Kim and Queen Latifah on the list representing the females, but in all honesty, Jean Grae and Rah Digga are both far better lyricists than the aforementioned women.

– I’m very happy that GZA & Method Man got a nod on this list, but GZA should have been higher without question; furthermore, where in the hell is Ghostface Killah? Tony Starks didn’t even make this list, and he should have easily cracked the top 15.

– Cats like Masta Ace & C.L. Smooth, and MF Doom didn’t get any recognition – not even an honorable mention.

– Although artists like Skyzoo and Elzhi are younger and haven’t garnered as much recognition as the rest on this list, they possess an enormous amount of skill, and if I had a say, they would have gotten some notoriety.

I really could go on-and-on about this list; they got a lot of things right, but outside of the top 10, they got even more wrong. At the end of the day, I can only voice my opinion and hope that people within the Hip-Hop community will open their eyes and realize that there is much more out there than what is seen on TV and heard on the radio.

You can view the entire list here.

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Video: Pharoahe Monch, “Still Standing”

Posted in Media, Video with tags , , on Tuesday, February 7, 2012 by Tim Althaus

I spotted this the other day when I logged onto Facebook, but I really didn’t have time to post it because of school work. “Still Standing” is the latest cut off of W.A.R. (We Are Renegades) to get the visual treatment, and much like “Clap (One Day)”, the video is very deep and has a lot of emotion behind it. If you still haven’t succumbed to greatness and purchased Pharoahe’s latest album, which is arguably one of the best efforts of 2011, break your headphones, and never listen to music again.

Mos Def, The Black Keys & Jim Jones – “Hoochie Coo”

Posted in Audio, Downloads, Media, Video with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on Monday, September 14, 2009 by Tim Althaus

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Holy shit. As you all know I love Hip-Hop, but I also love The Black Keys. There is something about their music that is so dynamic, that it pulls me right in. Their heavy Blues riffs, and great lyrics made me fall in love with their music. When I headed over to 2DopeBoyz today, I found out that the Black Keys are going to be putting out an album with a bunch of Hip-Hop guest appearances. On the album you will find: Mos Def, RZA, Jim Jones, Q-Tip, Raekwon, Pharoahe Monch & more. The album will be dropping on November 27th, or Black Friday. The project will be called Black Roc, and Dame Dash will have a pretty big part in this album being released.

Good Lord, this album sounds like it’s going to be incredible. The first single “Hoochie Coo” dropped today, and it features Mos Def & Jim Jones. I can assure you that I already like the Black Keys infused beats that I am hearing on this track. I think this album is going to be a force to be reckoned with.

Download: The Black Keys, “Hoochie Coo” (Feat. Jim Jones & Mos Def)

Album Review: Slaughterhouse, Slaughterhouse

Posted in Music Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , on Thursday, August 13, 2009 by Tim Althaus

slaughterhouse-718945 I (as well as everyone else) knew well before this album came out that this album was going to be a benchmark for lyrical linguistics. Joell Ortiz, Joe Budden, Crooked I & Royce Da 5’9″ are all known for their raw radical and introspective lyrics, and when you put them together the results are going to be monumental. On this album Slaughterhouse sets out to prove that although you may have thought Hip-Hop was close to dead, they plan on showing you it isn’t. I can almost assure you that there probably won’t be another album to come out this year that has anywhere near the lyrical display of this album. Continue reading

Pharoahe Monch Tears Up The Jazz Cafe

Posted in Media, Video with tags , , , , on Thursday, August 6, 2009 by Tim Althaus

It’s always great to hear news about Monch. The guy is a complete monster, and he definitely restfully resides in my top 5 emcees of all time. This video comes to us via 2DopeBoyz, and it features some footage of Pharoahe tearing up the Jazz Cafe in London. It’s nice to see these guys starting things off with a little Black Milk, because God knows it never hurt anyone. In the performance Monch runs through “The Matrix”, “Let’s Go” & “I’m Free” (Baatin tribute). Does anyone know when WAR is supposed to drop?

DJ JS-1 is “Ridiculous”

Posted in Audio, Downloads with tags , , , , on Wednesday, July 15, 2009 by Tim Althaus

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Here is another guy that all of you shouldn’t even think about sleeping on. DJ JS-1 just dropped his album Ground Original (No Sellout 2), and from what I’ve heard it’s the real deal. There are so many great guest appearances that I had to check this one out; to name a few: Copywrite, EMC, Aesop Rock, Vast Aire & many more (not to mention the emcees on the tracks posted). He just dropped a remix of the track “Ridiculous” that features Masta Ace, Pharoahe Monch & OC. If you have had any doubts about this album at all just take a listen to this track and I think you may be singing a slightly different tune.

Also Download:

DJ JS-1, “Nuthin” (Feat. Brother Ali, Sadat X & C.L. Smooth)

DJ JS-1, “Murder” (Feat. Killah Priest, Sean Price & Chino XL)

Spotted @ 2DopeBoyz

Wild Style Wednesday Review: Talib Kweli, Quality

Posted in Wildstyle Wednesdays with tags , , , , , , , on Wednesday, June 10, 2009 by Tim Althaus

Talib_Kweli_Quality I remember being a Junior at La Crescent High School and learning about poetry and poetical devices from an incredible teacher named Ms. Sandy. I took an interesting re-appraisal at the music that I had been listening to previously, and I realized (with the exception of classic rock) that the Rap I had been listening to was pretty shitty to be frank. I remember at the time I had been hearing about Talib, and the things that I had heard were so positive that I had to get one of his albums. Quality is the first Kweli album I purchased, and it was a great entrance into the world of malicious metaphors, sick similes, wicked words and brazen bars. To me, Talib Kweli is easily one of the greatest emcees of all time, and I thank God this album exposed me to him. Continue reading